Providing insight into the structure of scientific papers

How is a scientific paper structured and how related is it to other papers? These are some of the things that Iana Atanassova of the University of Bourgogne Franche-Comte (Besancon, France) focuses on in her research. She uses text and data mining (TDM) to study full-text scientific articles. Studying these papers can be a challenge, as they are usually in a format that is hard to process.

Text mining for the discovery of small molecules

When scientists need information about the structure, name or properties of small molecules, they often turn to a high quality database called ChEBI. This database is largely curated manually and this process takes a lot of time. OpenMinTeD is working on a textmining application that can help to speed up the process, while maintaining the quality of the database. 

 

 

 

 

Text and data mining in history

Joris van Eijnatten is professor of cultural history at Utrecht University, The Netherlands. He has a fascination for numbers that not many historians have. Last year he was the research fellow for digital humanities at the National Library of The Netherlands, where he applied text and data mining to study the image people have of Europe based on newspapers. I interviewed him about text and data mining in humanities, his work and his personal romance with numbers.

 

Learning software to systematically review articles

 Systematic review of medical research papers can lead to new knowledge and treatments of diseases. The existing software tools however, are very limited and often a lot of manual work is involved. Stephen Gilbert of Iowa State University uses artificial intelligence and machine learning to automate the process of systematic review.