Author Archive

Press Release: OpenMinTed Paving the Way for Text and Data Mining in Science

Background: Open Science era + the sheer volume of scholarly works (about 2.5 mi peer reviewed publications every year in English alone)

What OpenMinTeD is about: Researchers, Open Access publishers, librarians, repository managers and SMEs can now easily harness the power of text and data mining (TDM) for scientific content. The recently launched OpenMinTeD infrastructure, funded by the European  Commission H2020 Grant 654021, a preamble to the European Open Science Cloud, enables the registration and deployment of existing TDM tools and applications, the connection to OA scientific content, allowing researchers to seamlessly  discover, share, analyse and re-use knowledge. All, well presented and operating on a cloud infrastructure. It makes this possible through the OpenMinTeD Interoperability Guidelines, which address interoperability aspects for content and services.

TDM story: scientists as TDM-costumers

Stephane Schneider is IT project manager at the Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (INIST-CNRS). INIST has one of the most important collections of scientific publications in Europe and provides a range of information search services for science and higher education. Stephane tells about his work and what he expects for the future of TDM. 

Road signs blockade

Why the proposed Text and Data Mining exception is not what EU copyright law needs

Road signs blockade

Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash

1)Introduction

The Proposal for a Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market (the Proposal) contains a number of provisions intended to modernise EU copyright law and to make it “fit for the digital age”.[1] Some of these provisions have been object of a lively scholarly debate in the light of their controversial nature (the proposed adjustment of intermediary liability for copyright purposes contained in Art. 13, see here at p. 7) or because they propose to introduce a new right within the already variegate EU neighbouring right landscape (i.e. the protection for press publishers contained in Art. 11).

What microorganisms live in my cheese?

With a tasty bite of cheese necessarily come some microbial strains. Some of them are well known, but the presence of others can puzzle researchers and they might want to investigate why they are there. A better understanding of microorganisms, their interaction and their adaptation to their environment are important issues for research and industry. It could help improve public health or develop innovative products.